Texas Governor's Pardons Lawyer, Travis County

Texas Governor's Pardons

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! WE ARE NO LONGER HANDLING NEW PARDON CASES !

What is a Texas Governor's Pardon

The Law Office of Robert Keates assists and represents clients seeking a Texas State Governor's Pardon by aiding in gathering the accompanying documents and materials that must be attached to the lengthy Governor's Pardon Appliaction. Because Texas State Governor's Pardons offer no "oral argument" in court or testimony, a Texas State Governor's Pardon Application must be written and organized extremely well, giving the applicant the best possible chance to succeed. Read about Governor's Pardon's below, or call for a Free Phone Consultation at 512-800-3741.

The most important aspect is that granted pardons are a rare thing. It's entirely up to the discretion of the Governor on whether the pardon is granted or not. On felony pardon applications the main thing they look for when deciding whether to grant a pardon, is whether the person is experiencing economic hardship and trouble finding jobs because of the conviction. Most pardon applications are not granted, but for a conviction, it remains the only way to potentially clear the record of that offense.

! WE ARE NO LONGER HANDLING NEW PARDON CASES !

A full pardon restores certain citizenship rights forfeited by law as the result of a criminal conviction, such as the right to serve on a jury, the right to hold public office, and the right to serve as Executor or Administrator of an estate. It will also remove barriers to some, but not all, types of employment and professional licensing. However, licenses are granted at the discretion of the state licensing boards of each profession, so you may wish to check with a specific agency depending on your career or employer. A person who is convicted and who receives a full pardon is entitled under Article 55.01(a)(1)(B) to an Expunction of all arrest records relating to the conviction. The arrest is not automatically expunged upon a grant of a full pardon. This can only be accomplished by petitioning a court in the county of conviction.

Lastly, there is no guarantee that the Governor will accept filing a Petition for Full Pardon. The board will consider recommending a full pardon in misdemeanor cases only when exceptional, extreme, and unusual circumstances which prevents the applicant from gaining a livelihood or in the event of loss of civil rights. The office and the Texas Dept of Corrections/Criminal Justice receive many applications for pardons each year, and only a few are selected to receive a pardon. Once the Petition is authored and filed, there is a significant waiting period while the Governor's office reviews and makes a determination on whether to grant the pardon.

A full pardon restores certain citizenship rights forfeited by law as the result of a criminal conviction, such as the right to serve on a jury, the right to hold public office, and the right to serve as Executor or Administrator of an estate. In Texas, voting rights are automatically restored when one discharges a felony sentence. A full pardon will remove barriers to some, but not all, types of employment and professional licensing. However, licenses are granted at the discretion of the state licensing boards of each profession, and it is advisable to contact those boards directly to learn whether a pardon is necessary or sufficient to restore licensing eligibility in a particular field. A pardon will not restore eligibility to become a licensed peace officer in Texas. A person who is convicted and who receives a full pardon is entitled under Article 55.01(a)(1)(B) to an expunction of all arrest records relating to the conviction. The arrest is not automatically expunged upon a grant of a full pardon. This can only be accomplished by petitioning a court in the county of conviction.

! WE ARE NO LONGER HANDLING NEW PARDON CASES !

A pardon based on actual innocence exonerates an individual of the crime and erases the conviction. In order to consider a pardon for innocence, the Board requires either evidence of actual innocence from at least two trial officials; or the findings of fact and conclusions of law from the district judge in a state habeas action indicating actual innocence.


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